Birds at the “Bar”

Anhingas are like clowns. They have the funniest personalities, that is when they are not half asleep drying their wings out. They sway their head back and forth and honk when you walk by. The males have a black neck and the females have a brown or beige neck. I think that last one was yawning.

Egrets along the trail. A snowy, cattle and a great egret in the last one above.

Other birds along the trail at Circle B Bar Reserve in early January were a limpkin looking for food, a grebe doing his yoga stretch, a glossy ibis glowing in the sun and a hawk looking out over his domain.

And one of the hundreds of blue-gray gnatcatchers.

This little moorhen was walking along the trail with someone.

Linking to My Corner of the World.

More from my drive along Lake Apopka.

I rarely see baby purple gallinules. They are very skittish. I caught this little one running in between the reeds. Look at those big yellow feet!

The parents were close by.

Two juvenile common gallinules (or moorhens) hanging out.

The only birds I saw along the drive were common ones.

Turkey vultures are also common along the drive but it’s not often you get to see one up close and with a snack.

Young tree swallows perching on the utility wire. It’s rare to see these guys resting.

Another common site along the drive, an anhinga with a fish.

A beautiful morning to be out.

Our World Tuesday Graphicimage-in-ing: weekly photo linkup

Birds that eat fish

Anhingas are pretty common along any body of water in central Florida. They swim under water and spear fish with their beaks. They flip the fish into their mouths and swallow them whole.

I caught this one struggling a few minutes before getting it down.

There was an osprey flying right above me looking for fish. They swoop down and grab fish with their talons.

Snacking and nesting at Circle B Bar Reserve

Sandhill cranes were just starting to nest out in the marsh.

A new meaning to the term “Big Gulp”.

A wood stork trying not to drop the little fish.

Everyone was snacking including the limpkins.

It’s weird to see vultures flirting.

A cormorant flies by.

Lost of activity at Circle B Bar Reserve in mid March.

SkyWatch Friday

In the backyard

A house sparrow on our dock. They nest in the hole on the side of the dock.

A hawk sitting on our fence.

An anhinga getting a snack on our neighbor’s dock.

A woodpecker getting a snack on our palm tree.

A blue jay giving me a funny look while sitting on our neighbor’s boat.

Things on our muhly grass.

The moon in the backyard in the morning.

Just a few things in our backyard in the past couple of weeks.

Our World Tuesday Graphicimage-in-ing: weekly photo linkup

In the backyard

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I caught this anhinga about to take  gulp of fish down at the other end of the channel.

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The above were taken back in late October.  The wintering belted kingfisher made an appearance in our channel and was hanging out on my neighbor’s dock. These were all taken over the course of the weekend. and all were through the bedroom window.

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Then a few weeks later, I saw a different kingfisher on our dock.  The female kingfishers have a rust colored band across their chest so I knew it wasn’t the same one from late October. So, now we have both a male and female hanging around our channel this winter.  The female showed up on our dock late one day and was still there right before the sun went down. All taken through the bedroom window.

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Some of the plants and crittes in our yard.

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A great egret cruising through the backyard.

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Taken from our driveway back in November.

A few things from our yard in November.

SkyWatch Friday