Quick walk after work.

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He’s looking at her like “Why are you showing off?”

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Getting a drink and a bath at the same time.

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It’s already looking like summer.

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Flowers are blooming. Butterflies are everywhere.

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I think this is a northern parula.

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A male orchard oriole hiding in the bushes.

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I couldn’t help myself. Taking more hooded warbler pictures.

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I couldn’t decide which picture a liked more, the one above or below. Either way, just a weed growing along the trail.

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Stopped by Fort Desoto in late March after work. I didn’t have a lot of time before it got dark and was hoping to get some sunset pictures but it got cloudy as the sun was going down. No sunset but a few birds on the trails. So I got a good walk in before dark and then headed home.

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Yellow birds at Fort Desoto

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All above are white eyed vireos. Fairly common during migration.

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All of these are of a hooded warbler. The park was filled with these bright yellow birds with black hoods. They were not shy and would not freak out and fly into the bushes. They remained on the trail as long as no one got too close.

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I saw one prairie warbler at the park.

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A single yellow throated warbler. I don’t see these too often.

It poured the last Friday in March. I never get that lucky. Usually, it pours early in the week and by the time I get out to the parks, the birds are gone. This time I got up early on Saturday and headed down to Fort Desoto. Not a big fall out but still enough birds to keep everyone entertained. I think there was possibly more people than birds though.  I’m hoping this is only the first fall out for spring migration this year. It’s still early.

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We got fallout – Skywatch Friday

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My first cedar waxwing of the year. There were several in the bush and this was all I got.

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I think this is a female orchard oriole. With berry stains on her beak, looking at me.

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Same as above.

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One of the few male summer tanager sightings I saw.

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Another yellow bird. I’m still going with female orchard oriole.

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Same as above.

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An immature rose breasted grosbeak with berry stains on his chest.

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An immature male orchard oriole.

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Eastern kingbird all covered in berry stains.

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A male orchard oriole.

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A summer tanager with a bug in his beak.

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Hooded warbler with a bee in his beak.

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A prothonotary warbler so busy eating he didn’t even notice us.

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A few seconds later he looks up, all covered in berry juice.

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A crow chasing all of the little birds away from the fountain.

What a busy morning. In mid-April we got spring migration fall out at Fort Desoto. We had storms earlier in the week but the birds stayed put through the weekend. I was expecting to show up at the park and only see cardinals.  Birds were busy hopping from bush to tree and back. Most were eating the mulberries but some were also eating bugs. You really had to pay attention to get pictures for the few seconds they sit still which is hard to do when you keep running into people you haven’t seen since last spring migration and you want to catch up. There were a lot of people on the trails but everyone was nice and pointed out what they were seeing. There were lots of bird experts there and I was going to try to take notes but I was afraid I’d miss something if I stopped to write something down. April was a busy month so I’ll have more little bright bird pictures. If I got any of these wrong, please let me know.

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A spring migration tease in late March.

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My first sighting of the morning was a black and white warbler.

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Then a hooded warbler.

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Then a yellow rumpled warbler. These have been around most of the winter.

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A barn swallow sitting still. I’ve never seen one sitting still before.

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Another hooded warbler landing right beside me on the ground.

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Another black and white warbler later in the morning.

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These birds are so funny they way they hang upside down most of the time.

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I only saw one yellow throat warbler that morning.

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Another hooded warbler?  The trees were dripping with them and they were not being shy.

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One last parting hooded shot before heading home.

I think this day was “Hooded Warbler Day” at Fort Desoto. They were everywhere at the park in late March. There wasn’t much of a variety though. Just tons of the above. I had heard there was a worm eating warbler there as well but I could not find him. It would have been a first for me. I’m hoping this was just the beginning of spring migration and it doesn’t fizzle out. If the winds are favorable for the birds through April, they will just keep flying right past us without stopping for a snack.

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Little yellow birds invade Fort Desoto

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Hooded warblers were everywhere. They were walking around in the grass and posing for everyone. I saw this bird last year but never got a shot so this is my first official hooded warbler shot.

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Prairie warblers aren’t too common. There were many of these on the east beach trails.

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After I cropped this up I realized there were tiny white bugs all over the leaves. I think that’s what he was eating.

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White eyed vireos are common during spring migration.

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This one was trying to hide in the fir trees.

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Yellow throated warblers were common around the ranger’s house this weekend.

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My very first prothonotary warbler.

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He was posing for me right when I hit the trail that morning.

Central west Florida had a small fall-out this past weekend. A big storm came through the Tampa Bay area on Thursday and by Friday afternoon, people were posting great migrating birds all over the area. The most populated seemed to be at Fort Desoto so I headed down there early Saturday morning. I skipped the beach and went straight to the woods. I spent over 4 hours looking for little birds in the bushes and trees.  Of course, everyone else had the same idea so it was pretty crowded on trails. Everyone was so nice pointing out things they had seen. I do not know my little birds very well and usually shoot first and look up species later. Saturday I left knowing all but one bird that I had taken pictures of. It was a lot of fun and I met a lot of new people and ran into a few old friends I haven’t seen in a long time.  I also saw a few red and blue birds that aren’t cardinals or blue jays so I’ll post those later.

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