All the colors of the rainbow passing through.

A not very common Swainson’s Thrush.

Summer tanagers. The bottom one is an immature male.It’s cool to see them when they are half yellow and half red.

Gray birds: a wood pee wee and a catbird.

I think this is a female Orchard Oriole.

Baltimore Oriole.

Beautiful blue indigos.

Red eyed vireos.

Magnolia Warbler

A bay breasted warbler was hiding high up in the trees all morning.

Lots of different little birds at Fort Desoto at the end of April.

Linking to Wednesday Around the World. 

A rainbow of birds at Fort Desoto

Painted buntings were all over the ground.

Summer tanager.

Scarlet tanagers have black wings.

Lots of prothonotary warblers.

An immature male orchard oriole. He’ll turn a burnt dark orange after his next molt.

Above are female orchard orioles.

A rare Kentucky warbler.

An immature blue indigo looking back at me.

Fort Desoto Park in south Pinellas county is known as a hot spot for birds migrating through in the spring and fall. The birds seem to be more plentiful in spring vs. fall migration. All of the above were seen in a 2 hour period in mid-April. Just standing quietly in the bushes watching them fly in and eat the mulberries with 20 or so other people. All with our long lenses and binoculars. I was using my 300mm lens with a 1.4 extender to zoom in. These are also cropped up so we were all pretty far away.

 

 

Going home with “warbler neck”

dsc_5975 dsc_6020

Summer tanagers were posing for the crowd.

dsc_6042

Black and white warbler with a bug.

dsc_6072

Redstart hiding in the shadows.

dsc_6082

dsc_6086

Blue gray gnatcatchers eating bugs.

dsc_6102

A rare yellow billed cuckoo was the star of the day. I had seen one once before at Circle B Bar Reserve but there were many birders there that had their first sighting of one. He was high up in the tree but everyone was able to get a good shot.

dsc_6150

The one of many palm warblers that hang out here in the winter.

dsc_6166

White eyed vireos will be common to spot this winter.

dsc_6046

dsc_6175

I was told the two above were Nashville warblers. Can anyone confirm?

dsc_6205

A brief glimpse of a Tennessee warbler.

dsc_6095

My first Philadelphia Vireo. He was hanging around the cuckoo.

“We got fall out!” was the term used on the bird forums.  Fort Desoto Park was covered in birds that had stopped for a rest on their way south for the winter in early October. I got to the park around 8am and many people already looking up in the oak trees at the picnic area. I spent several hours taking tons of pictures and had “warbler neck” from staring straight up into the trees for so long. A nap after lunch got rid of that. It’s not often you get a day where you can stand under a tree and see so many different birds.

More birds passing through

DSC_1858

A very young Baltimore oriole way up high in the tree. He didn’t have all of his adult feathers in yet.

DSC_1888

A black throated blue warbler.

DSC_1893

A black throated green warbler.

DSC_1919

DSC_1930

A few blackpoll warblers in the mulberry bushes.

DSC_1937

I think this is a female black throated blue warbler.

DSC_1951

DSC_1956

Brown thrashers were eating the mulberries.

DSC_1977

DSC_1989

Summer tanagers were in the oak trees.

DSC_1995

This is either a female scarlet tanager or a summer tanager.

DSC_2011

A lone indigo bunting.

Spring migration felt a little slow this year. It was much harder to find the birds at Fort Desoto. It felt like there were more people than birds in the woods. It was still a fun morning out. No new birds this spring but there’s always next year.

Just passing through

DSC_0668

Yellow bellied sapsucker.

DSC_0644

DSC_0683

DSC_0686

DSC_0688

Lots of indigo buntings including the juvenile in the last picture. He hasn’t got all of his blue feathers in yet.

DSC_0732

The scarlet tanager has black wings.

DSC_0786

The summer tanager is the only all red bird in America (according to All About Birds)

DSC_0822

Female red breasted merganser.

DSC_0872

And a pretty cactus flower just for fun.

These were taken at Fort Desoto in early April when spring migrating birds were stopping by for a rest before heading north for the summer. There wasn’t a ton of birds but a few good ones.

Our World Tuesday Graphicimage-in-ing

A rainbow of birds at Fort Desoto

DSC_8442

A scarlet tanager looking at me. Maybe he thinks I’m after his berry.

DSC_8584

A summer tanager with a bug hanging out of his beak.

DSC_8594

Another scarlet tanager with a beak full.

DSC_8622

A female and male painted bunting.

DSC_8634

He has mulberry juice on his beak.

DSC_8649

She’s got mulberry pieces hanging out of her mouth.

DSC_8647

These birds were chowing down.

DSC_8740

Another tanager posing.

So many pretty birds at Fort Desoto during spring migration. The mulberry trees were full and the birds were hungry. We all just stood in a line and quietly watched them eat. The big prize of the day was the painted buntings.There were several at the park that morning. This is the first decent picture I’ve gotten of one. I also took a ton of blue birds More on those later.

We got fallout – Skywatch Friday

DSC_7682

My first cedar waxwing of the year. There were several in the bush and this was all I got.

DSC_7838

I think this is a female orchard oriole. With berry stains on her beak, looking at me.

DSC_7841

Same as above.

DSC_7858

One of the few male summer tanager sightings I saw.

DSC_7862

Another yellow bird. I’m still going with female orchard oriole.

DSC_7886

Same as above.

DSC_7893

An immature rose breasted grosbeak with berry stains on his chest.

DSC_7903

An immature male orchard oriole.

DSC_7910

Eastern kingbird all covered in berry stains.

DSC_8042

A male orchard oriole.

DSC_8054

A summer tanager with a bug in his beak.

DSC_8058

Hooded warbler with a bee in his beak.

DSC_8065

A prothonotary warbler so busy eating he didn’t even notice us.

DSC_8075

A few seconds later he looks up, all covered in berry juice.

DSC_8037

A crow chasing all of the little birds away from the fountain.

What a busy morning. In mid-April we got spring migration fall out at Fort Desoto. We had storms earlier in the week but the birds stayed put through the weekend. I was expecting to show up at the park and only see cardinals.  Birds were busy hopping from bush to tree and back. Most were eating the mulberries but some were also eating bugs. You really had to pay attention to get pictures for the few seconds they sit still which is hard to do when you keep running into people you haven’t seen since last spring migration and you want to catch up. There were a lot of people on the trails but everyone was nice and pointed out what they were seeing. There were lots of bird experts there and I was going to try to take notes but I was afraid I’d miss something if I stopped to write something down. April was a busy month so I’ll have more little bright bird pictures. If I got any of these wrong, please let me know.

Check out more sky pictures at Skywatch Friday