On the trail at Circle B Bar Reserve

Great egrets and spoonbills were in the air and in the muck.

Bittern, limpkin, anhinga and wood stork on the trail.

A house wren hiding in the bushes.

Coot with cool feet.

A kingfisher actually sitting still.

Purple gallinule eating something yucky.

Lots of activity in late March at Circle B Bar Reserve but nothing unusual.

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Same Ole, Same Ole

The barred owls have been hanging out next to the parking lot for a while now.

The reserve is full of green herons. They are now a usual suspect.

Along with male anhingas showing off.

And the glossy ibis sparkling in the sun are a dime a dozen.

The cute pied grebes aren’t as skittish as they use to be.

There’s always snowy egrets in a body of water.

Now I see purple gallinules every time I walk Alligator Alley trail.

Even a great blue heron baby in the nest during spring is common here.

Seeing a bald eagle somewhere in the park is pretty common, even if its way up high half hidden in a cypress tree.

But I still love walking the trails at Circle B Bar Reserve and seeing all of the above every time I’m here. Even when it gets crowded on the weekends. I just get there a little earlier and leave before lunch when the crowd starts coming in.

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Morning walk with the usual suspects.

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The anhingas are always along the trail striking a pose.

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All of the usuals: green heron, wood stork, snowy egret and limpkin.

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I’ve been seeing the purple gallinules on a regular basis in the same spot. The one with the tan face is a juvenile, not yet fully purple. Probably born last spring.

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An uncommon blue headed vireo.

A few flying things on my walk at Circle B Bar Reserve in early February.

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A walk after work

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The lake at Kapok Park are full of turtles. People feed them and they come close to the boardwalk.  Look at those fingernails!

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A cute grebe shying away.

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The red-winged blackbirds come close the boardwalk as well. Both a male and a female were posing for me.

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Moorhens were taking a bath.

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A rare sighting at this park. I found a lone purple gallinule under the boardwalk. I have never seen one here or even heard of one near the area.

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Great blue heron flyby.

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The big old trees at the park. It looks like one got blown over during a big storm. It looks like such a big strong tree. It’s hard to believe wind would knock that over.

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On the way home I stopped by downtown Safety Harbor and could just barely make out a juvenile eagle on the cell tower.

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Another tower close by had two babies (you can see only one in the picture). One of the parents was feeding them and the other parent was on a utility tower across the street.  I’ve been keeping an eye on these nests for a while, swinging by there on the way home from work. It’s great to see these eagles raising families in this busy neighborhood.

I stopped by Kapok Park on the way home from work recently and did a quick walk around the park. I was hoping to see signs of the great horned owls but they either didn’t nest there this year or already nested and left.

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These purple clowns make me laugh.

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The purple gallinules are so much fun to watch. They are like little purple clowns trying to navigate the plants. If they walk out on a stem that can’t hold their weight, they slide down to the end and try to hang on. They stop to check you out for a second and then continue to try to eat the plant. They are pretty scarce until the fall and then there is usually a few families hanging out in the plants close to the trail.

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The above is a juvenile purple gallinule that was born early this past spring. He hasn’t quite gotten his bright feathers in yet but he already has those big yellow feet. He was still trying to climb around without falling down.

These were all taken in mid-November at Circle B Bar Reserve.

Saturday's Critters

Pretty birds doing everyday things.

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A purple gallinule shining through the reeds.

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A pretty common yellowthroat in the shade.

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A cute grebe floating around.

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A little blue heron taking a gulp.

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A red-eyed vireo being shy.

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A downy woodpecker high up in a tree.

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A limpkin looking down at me from up above.

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A palm warbler reaching for the stars.

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A white pelican all alone.

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Moorhens imitating each other.

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Tiny hummingbirds humming in the firebush.

Some of the birds on my recent walk around Circle B Bar Reserve.

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Pretty as a peacock

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I only see purple gallinules in central Florida. Usually at Circle B Bar Reserve in Lakeland which is where I saw this guy. They are in the same family as moorhens (also known as common gallinules) and those are all over the Tampa Bay area (or at least closer to the coast). I had heard they were back on Heron Hideout trail in the alligator flag plants. They eat the seeds hanging off the plants (picture above). I only saw one in late October. He was close to the trail for a few minutes then hid behind the plant. They are usually fun to watch, like tiny purple clowns but this one seemed shy.

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