The usual suspects at Lettuce Lake Park


The parks are full of white eyed vireos and phoebes right now.

“Common” yellowthroats are pretty common as well.

Doves get no respect even though they have pretty pink feet.

Limpkin eating a snail.

These are actually pretty cool bees, although I wouldn’t want to disturb that nest.

Gators and lizards.

Muhly grass in bloom.

Linking to Wednesday Around the World

My favorite little birds.

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My favorite little titmouse coming to check me out.

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My next favorite blue-gray gnatcatchers. They would be my favorite but they are so annoying the way they don’t sit still for a second.

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Other usual birds at the park: white eyed vireo, cardinal, eastern phoebe, female red winged blackbird and the always present red bellied woodpecker.

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It’s hard to ignore the cute squirrels.

Stuff at Chesnut Park in early January.

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Common and uncommon birds at Chesnut Park

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Above are some of the common birds you see in the winter here. An Eastern phoebe, a catbird, a black and white warbler and a blue-gray gnatcatcher.

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Another common year round bird, the pileated woodpecker. Most of the time I usually hear them screaming from high up in the trees. This one came down a little closer.

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A house wren is not that common.

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Yellow throated warblers are common in the winter but they tend to hide up in the palm trees and under the palms.

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I think these are all pine warblers.

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Not a common bird for me to see, a black capped chickadee. There were several high up in the trees near the boardwalk.

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A very strange but not uncommon bird flying over the lake.

Lots of little birds flying around Chesnut Park in early November (a few big ones too).

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Busy morning on the trail.

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A wren hiding in the bushes. I think this is either a house or marsh wren.

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Cormorant fly-bys.

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Several limpkins were eating along the trail.

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So many limpkins have grown up right on the trail. They are not easily frightened.  In the first picture, I saw this big group of school kids heading down the trail and I didn’t think the limpkin was going to move. He didn’t. He just stood there like “You guys are in my way.” The kids eventually went around him one by one.

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A snowy egret and cormorant hanging around the dock.

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There were so many phoebes there. There was a constant echo of their call.

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Close enough.

All from my recent trip to Circle B Bar Reserve in central Florida.

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A new bird for Christmas

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Not the new bird I was looking for. This phoebe was trying to confuse me.

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This mockingbird is not the new bird either although it looks like him from far away.

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“OH wait, come back. I think you’re the new bird”.

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Yea! He did come back with a snack. My first scissor-tailed flycatcher.

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And I found him on my first try.

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Right on utility wire at the curve in the road at Fort Desoto park. Right where people had been reporting him for a while now. He’s really pretty.

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While I was waiting for him to come back, I entertained myself by taking pictures of butterflies on the side of the road.

SkyWatch Friday

If birds could talk

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“I need to get an agent” said the limpkin who sat there while tons of people were taking his picture.

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“I’m going back to sleep” said the grumpy red shoulder hawk.

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“I’m not going to do anything interesting. Take my picture just like this lady” said the great blue heron.

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‘Yes, we are a dime a dozen” said all of the phoebes.

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“Look ma, no hands” said the anhinga climbing up the branch.

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“What are you looking at?” said the snowy egret.

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“No I’m not going to look at you just so you can take my picture” said the gnatcatcher.

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“We’re trying to blend in but I don’t think it’s working” said the great egret to the cattle egret.

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“Everyone look up at me” said the rare Harrier Hawk.

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“She’d better be bringing home bacon cause I’m tired of bringing all the sticks” said the bald eagle as he headed for the nest.

Lots of birds but not a lot of activity in mid-November. They were all just sitting there, except for the eagles. They were both bringing sticks back to the nest. You could see them flying back and forth over the trail heading to the nest but you can’t see the nest. It’s hidden high up in the trees, facing the lake. In the mornings before 11am, people are lined up on the trail to see the eagles flying back and forth.

The Northern Harrier hawk was a surprise. It was a first time ever seeing one. I had heard there was one flying around earlier but didn’t think I would see it and right before leaving he flew right over my head.

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Up in the trees at Circle B Bar Reserve

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The usual phoebe.

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Juvenile bald eagle up in a dead tree.

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What a great face!

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Pileated woodpecker climbing up.

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Trying to get that berry.

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He was across the creek and high up in the trees.

A few things in the trees at Circle B Bar Reserve in mid-November.

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Also, check out more birds at Paying Ready Attention for