Duck action at Lake Morton

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An unusual looking hybrid.  Looks like a cross between a mallard and a muscovy duck.

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A baby mallard in December!

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A coot and a gull fighting over bread that someone threw in the lake.

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Duck butts!

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A lone female bufflehead. Not a common duck here.

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A ring neck duck taking a bath.

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Drying off.

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I cannot figure out what kind of duck this is.  Is it a hybrid of some sort? I’ve only seen one at the lake. That pink beak and the pink legs are amazing as well as the eyes.

I found out today that this is a Coscoroba swan. It is the smallest of all swans and comes from South America.  The city of Lakeland bought a pair for the lake last January. At this point there is only one at the lake.

There are so many different ducks at Lake Morton in downtown Lakeland. They are known for having swans on the lake but there are a lot more ducks there and so many different ones. It’s fun just to walk around and look at all the duck action going on.

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Birds missing a body part at Save Our Seabirds

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Brown pelican missing a wing.

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Look closely at the legs and feet of this sandhill crane. His left foot is wrapped up and his right leg is a prostetic leg.

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This one has a prosthetic left leg.

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This one is waiting to get his new leg.

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This great blue heron is missing his entire right wing. But still eating well.

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I’m not sure what’s wrong with this laughing gull but he looks rough.

When hubby and I visited Mote Marine laboratory in Sarasota, we made a quick walk through of the Save Our Seabirds  sanctuary next door. They treat injured birds. They release the ones that can live in the wild and keep the ones that are permanently injured. They have nice big aviaries for the residents. They are known for giving the sandhill cranes prosthetic legs. So many of the cranes are hit by cars and lose legs. Most of these injuries are made by man so the least we “men” can do is help them out. Save Our Seabirds do a great job. If you’re ever near Sarasota, stop by for a visit.