The ladies were out at the Botanical Gardens

This female summer tanager did not mind me watching her while she feasted on a beautyberry bush. Or, maybe she didn’t see me. I was hiding in the bushes after all. She stayed for a few minutes filling up on berries and then took off.

A female indigo bunting was hiding in the bushes.

A female rose breasted grosbeak was eating something high up in the tree.

Female woodpeckers. A pileated and a downy.

Both males and females look the same for thrashers and green herons so these could be either.

My Corner of the World

A new bird in late October

I had heard he was there for a over a week before I made it down to Fort Desoto. I headed down to the park early one Saturday morning in late October thinking it would be a needle in the haystack story. As I drove into the park I saw several people with binoculars in a field near the boat ramp. After walking through ankle deep ant infested water (the field was flooded due to recent rains) I found the Vermilion Flycatcher. He was out in the open buzzing from tree to tree so it was pretty easy to spot that flash of red unless you weren’t paying attention and thought it was a cardinal. It was the first time I have heard of one being in the Tampa bay area so there were a lot of people coming through that morning looking for him. He’s a beautiful bird and totally worth enduring the over 50 ant bites.

Otherwise, there were just the usual migrating birds at the park. This female rose breasted grosbeak was very accommodating.

The white pelicans are back but they were across the lagoon. You can tell how much bigger they are than our resident brown pelicans.

Osprey have taken over the park. They are everywhere.

Shorebirds near the fishing pier.

TOTO is still hanging out at the park. He’s got a band on his legs with TOTO. I’ve been taking pictures of him for over 8 years. He’s always there with his girlfriend.

image-in-ing: weekly photo linkupOur World Tuesday Graphic

Visiting the little ones.

Visiting my titmouse friends at Chesnut Park.

Saw several yellow throated warblers including one that landed on the boardwalk.

A young northern parula.

Black capped chickadees are common here during migration.

The usual birds were out on the dock, a limpkin and green heron.

Birds at Chesnut Park in September.

Linking to Wednesday Around the World.

They all look alike

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This one looks like a female common yellowthroat. Although, it also looks like a female hooded warbler.

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The above two looks more like a female hooded warbler.

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Possible pine warbler.

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Or these could be a pine warbler.

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This is an easy one. A yellow throated warbler.

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A palm warbler.

All of these little yellow guys look alike. Especially the females.  Pine, Palm, Prairie or Polka Dots???   I can’t keep them straight. Next spring I’m going to take the time to write down what they are as I am taking pictures if someone there knows. Sometimes I have different people telling me the same bird is something different so that’s even more confusing. These were all taken in mid-November at Chesnut Park. It was a busy day for little yellow birds.

“Warbler Neck” part 2

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All of the above look almost alike. There are a few differences in some of them.  One has a black bill while the others have orange bills.  I was told that morning at Fort Desoto by “bird experts” that these were flycatchers.   They could be eastern woodpee or a least flycatcher.  They all looked like eastern phoebes to me.

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There were a few redstarts in the trees. I’m not sure why they call them redstarts. They don’t have any red in them, only yellow and orange.

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I think this is a Tennessee warbler.

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A new bird for me, a Swainson’s Thrush. He was high up in the trees and I had to brighten up this one.

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This looks like a young mockingbird.

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A usual sight during migration, a black and white warbler.

Next year I’m going to take the time to take notes on what these birds are.  I heard several times different people calling birds different things. I usually come home and look everything up but they are all starting to look the same. Please correct me if any of these are wrong.

Big ball of fire in the trees.

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This was the most popular bird at Fort Desoto on a Saturday morning in early October. Not that summer tanagers are very rare during migration. Not because he was a juvenile male that hadn’t completely molted into his red feathers yet. It was his curiosity and his willingness to show off that everyone was taking a ton of pictures of him. He was hanging out very low in the trees while all of the other birds stayed up high. He would bring his snack to a visible spot for all to see while he was eating.

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He would swoop down and get very close and pose for everyone. People with long lenses were pulling out their phones to take pictures of him. I took the two above with my phone. You can see the orange and yellow dot sitting on the big branch in the first one. He really had everyone entertained that morning.

Linking to Saturday’s Critters