Lots of the same at Chesnut Park

Lots of deer in early January.

Lots of squirrels but that bottom looks a little rough.

Lots of little birds but nothing new.

Red shoulder hawks hiding along the trails.

Eagles flying far away across the lake. Both an adult and a juvenile.

Found these two ducks at a quiet end of a pond. I’m thinking they are pets that got dumped here. Someone left food in a small plastic container. I just hope they know enough to stay away from the gators.

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Funny faces at the zoo

“Gimmi a kiss, lady”.

A fun day at the zoo over Thanksgiving week while my sister was visiting. The young zebra eating while mom was watching over was born last July.

A black and white warbler hiding out in a tree.

Pretty birds and lunch for some of the birds in the aviary. After this appetizing walk through the aviary it was time for us to leave and go have lunch (we opted for salads).

The zoo was decorated for the holiday season.

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Chesnut Park in late February.

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Sleepy barred owl high up in a tree.

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A few usuals – black and white warbler, grackle and a cardinal.

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A pileated woodpecker taken right into the sun.

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A great blue heron flying close over my head.

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I saw this hawk eating something that looked like a really big beetle.

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The water near the dock is full of these.

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A few of my friends came by to say “Hi” while I was at Chesnut Park in late February.

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Common and uncommon birds at Chesnut Park

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Above are some of the common birds you see in the winter here. An Eastern phoebe, a catbird, a black and white warbler and a blue-gray gnatcatcher.

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Another common year round bird, the pileated woodpecker. Most of the time I usually hear them screaming from high up in the trees. This one came down a little closer.

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A house wren is not that common.

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Yellow throated warblers are common in the winter but they tend to hide up in the palm trees and under the palms.

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I think these are all pine warblers.

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Not a common bird for me to see, a black capped chickadee. There were several high up in the trees near the boardwalk.

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A very strange but not uncommon bird flying over the lake.

Lots of little birds flying around Chesnut Park in early November (a few big ones too).

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“Warbler Neck” part 2

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All of the above look almost alike. There are a few differences in some of them.  One has a black bill while the others have orange bills.  I was told that morning at Fort Desoto by “bird experts” that these were flycatchers.   They could be eastern woodpee or a least flycatcher.  They all looked like eastern phoebes to me.

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There were a few redstarts in the trees. I’m not sure why they call them redstarts. They don’t have any red in them, only yellow and orange.

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I think this is a Tennessee warbler.

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A new bird for me, a Swainson’s Thrush. He was high up in the trees and I had to brighten up this one.

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This looks like a young mockingbird.

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A usual sight during migration, a black and white warbler.

Next year I’m going to take the time to take notes on what these birds are.  I heard several times different people calling birds different things. I usually come home and look everything up but they are all starting to look the same. Please correct me if any of these are wrong.

Going home with “warbler neck”

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Summer tanagers were posing for the crowd.

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Black and white warbler with a bug.

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Redstart hiding in the shadows.

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Blue gray gnatcatchers eating bugs.

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A rare yellow billed cuckoo was the star of the day. I had seen one once before at Circle B Bar Reserve but there were many birders there that had their first sighting of one. He was high up in the tree but everyone was able to get a good shot.

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The one of many palm warblers that hang out here in the winter.

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White eyed vireos will be common to spot this winter.

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I was told the two above were Nashville warblers. Can anyone confirm?

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A brief glimpse of a Tennessee warbler.

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My first Philadelphia Vireo. He was hanging around the cuckoo.

“We got fall out!” was the term used on the bird forums.  Fort Desoto Park was covered in birds that had stopped for a rest on their way south for the winter in early October. I got to the park around 8am and many people already looking up in the oak trees at the picnic area. I spent several hours taking tons of pictures and had “warbler neck” from staring straight up into the trees for so long. A nap after lunch got rid of that. It’s not often you get a day where you can stand under a tree and see so many different birds.