Residents birds and birds passing through.

DSC_1728

DSC_1722

Yellow-throated warblers are moving through, heading south for the winter.

DSC_1715

I think this is a northern parula.   They are common right now but this one looks a little scruffy

DSC_1709

A male cardinal eating a berry.

DSC_1707

The female cardinal is wondering why he isn’t sharing his berry.

DSC_1700

DSC_1696

The two above pictures are a yellow warbler.

The titmouse and cardinals are year round residents at Chesnut park. The other ones are just passing though.  On their way south for the winter. Although, when I took these in mid-September it did not feel like winter would be coming any time soon. Fall migration is in full swing here in Florida but I feel like I’m missing it with work and vacation. Brett and I spent some time in Flagstaff, Arizona hiking in late September. We had beautiful cool weather so I felt like I had a tiny taste of fall. I’m working on the tons of pictures I took now so I’ll be bombarding you with those soon.

Our World Tuesday Graphicimage-in-ing

Birds and birders at Fort Desoto

The resident long billed curlew was prancing around in front of a large group of birders. He’s almost too tame. He was walking so close to people that they were backing up to take pictures of him

Piping plover staring at something.

An osprey flew close to this huge flock of birds and spooked them into flying around. It was mostly laughing gulls, skimmers, royal terns and sandwich terns. I know these birds need their rest but it was a nice sight to see.

A small sampling of the large flocks of birds resting on beach. I didn’t notice until I got home and cropped the shot that I caught a fish jumping up in the back of the picture.

Just a few of the birders that were there on a recent Saturday morning. They were enjoying the big group of birds resting on the low tide spit in the north beach lagoon.

The above could be: a) male yellow warbler (common here lately and has the brown stripes on the chest.), b) Cape May warbler (one was sighted minutes earlier, adult male winter has the same colors) or c)something totally different.  Several seasoned birders there had different opinions on what this was.

I was told this was a first year male common yellowthroat warbler.

This was another one that was with the one above. I think both are same.

I almost didn’t go. I had been to Fort Desoto several weeks in a row with little luck. I decided to try one last time for that jaeger and I had several friends that would be there on an audubon walk. I headed first to the gulf fishing pier and found the jeager pretty quick. After taking a few hundred shots of it, I headed to the woods to catch up with the group.  The woods didn’t have a large assortment of little birds. Just the few above. Then we headed up to the north beach marsh where tons of birds were resting. It turned out to be a beautiful morning even though I didn’t get too many migrating birds.

Check out more pictures at Our World Tuesday Our World Tuesday Graphic

Also, check out more birds at Paying Ready Attention  for

Chesnut Park in late September.

Downy or Hairy? I’m going with Downy since her beak looks a little longer and Hairys are pretty rare here.

Yellow warbler. This was the most exciting bird of the day.

Injured butterfly.

I arrived at the park, parked my car, got out and walked around to the other side and started to get all of my camera gear out. I hear a noise behind me and when I turn around, this lady was standing there watching me. I turned around with my camera and she just went back to her grazing. Some of the deer are pretty skittish so I was surprised that she just ignored me.

A small bridge deep in the woods.

Another quiet morning at Chesnut Park. I saw lots of osprey, titmouse and carolina wrens. Even the yellow warbler is fairly common. There’s a small trickle of fall migrants coming through but it’s hit or miss and I seem to be missing mostly. At this point it was the end of September and I was reading on the local boards that a few were passing through but work kept getting in way. It was still a nice morning out. I did meet a retired man named Joe who volunteers for the Audubon of Florida’s Eagle Watch program. We had met briefly before at one of the local Eagle Watch presentations. When I told him that I lived near the park, he told me about a great eagle’s nest that was close by my house to keep an eye on this winter. I found the nest on the way home so I’ll keep you posted later this year. Most of the eagles have returned to the area for the winter but it’s hard to find them since they aren’t spending a lot of time on their nest yet.

Check out more pictures at Our World Tuesday  Our World Tuesday Graphic

Also, check out more birds at Paying Ready Attention for

End of my spring migration at Fort DeSoto

I don’t know what this is. It looks bigger than a yellow rumped warbler.  It was bathing at the fountain. Could it be a female American redstart?  It looks like one from the Stokes Birding Guide. If so, it’s my first one.

Orange eating an orange. Baltimore oriole at one of the fruit feeders.

I think this is a wood thrush. He was sitting on the bottom of the fountain.

My first and only indigo bunting shot. I saw a few others from really far away but this was the only one that got close to us at the fountain.

Starling taking a bath.

I was told this is a yellow warbler. This was my first sighting of one. I agree with Deb’s comment on this one. It looks more like a female hooded warbler than a yellow one. It’s still a lifer either way.

About a tenth of the crowd that was gathering at the mulberry woods at Fort Desoto. There’s a small open field with a short stone fountain in the middle. Everyone was standing around waiting for birds to land on the fountain. I only had my long lens that morning so I could only get a small smattering of the crowd that was there.

Short video of the wood thrush singing in the trees. Of course the man standing next to me just had to talk during my video. Then the bird flew away.

I can say I was there! Two weekends during the 2012 spring migration at Fort Desoto. I met tons of people. Learned a lot of new little birds. And took thousands of bad pictures. Ron at Pinellas Birds said the week before Memorial Day that it was winding down. There were still a few late migraters coming through though so I’ll still head out and keep my eyes open. Now I can’t wait until fall migration.

Check out more pictures at Our World Tuesday  Our World Tuesday Graphic

Also, check out more birds at