A very quick spring migration

The mangroves along the road at Fort Desoto Park were full of female indigo buntings. They were the most accommodating birds.  All of the others were staying hidden.

There were yellow warblers all over the park.

We had one lone bay breasted warbler in the mangroves.

A single black throated green warbler kept us entertained for a while.

I’m not sure if this is a eastern kingbird or an eastern wood-pewee.

The ruby throated  hummingbirds were out this morning. There were several females hanging out at the firebush.

We only had a small sprinkle of birds stopping over on their way north for the summer in April. On the first Friday in May we had a big storm come through the area. On Saturday morning I got up early and headed down to Fort Desoto to see if any birds had landed to take a break before heading north. The park was full of little birds. Most were hiding but I managed to get a few shots of them deep in the bushes. There were a lot of barn swallows flying around but after torturing myself for a few minutes trying to get pictures I gave up.

After work walk at Sawgrass Lake Park

Little critters.

Swimming critters.

A scarlet tanager high up in a tree with a snack and a pair of doves that were flirting.

A squirrel eating a branch.

Stopped by Sawgrass Lake park after work in late May for a quick walk before heading home. I didn’t expect to find too much but the scarlet tanager was nice.

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Blue Grosbeaks and a few other birds

Blue grosbeaks were all over Fort Desoto during spring migration back in late April.  The all blue ones are males and the blue and brown one is a juvenile male that will eventually be all blue.

Hanging out on the fence. The light brown ones are females.

I think this is a very young male rose breasted grosbeak.

A laughing gull playing with his food.

A cardinal checking himself out in the mirror in the parking lot.

Osprey are everywhere at the park.

SkyWatch Friday

Early start to spring migration

My first ovenbird, hiding deep in the bushes.

My first Louisiana Waterthrush at the fountain.

An unidentified bird on the top. Any ideas?  The 2nd one is a Cape May Warbler.

Eastern kingbird high up in the tree.

A blurry shot of a young blue grosbeak. I thought his color was interesting. I guess he’s molting into his adult male colors.

An osprey with a fish.

And a pretty moth.

By  mid April there hadn’t been too many birds passing through on their way north for the summer.  I headed down to Fort Desoto Park expecting not to find too much. As usual there were more people than birds on the trails. Not too many birds but some good ones. Two new birds for me, the ovenbird and waterthrush so it was a good morning.

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More birds passing through

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A very young Baltimore oriole way up high in the tree. He didn’t have all of his adult feathers in yet.

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A black throated blue warbler.

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A black throated green warbler.

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A few blackpoll warblers in the mulberry bushes.

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I think this is a female black throated blue warbler.

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Brown thrashers were eating the mulberries.

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Summer tanagers were in the oak trees.

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This is either a female scarlet tanager or a summer tanager.

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A lone indigo bunting.

Spring migration felt a little slow this year. It was much harder to find the birds at Fort Desoto. It felt like there were more people than birds in the woods. It was still a fun morning out. No new birds this spring but there’s always next year.

Just passing through

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Yellow bellied sapsucker.

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Lots of indigo buntings including the juvenile in the last picture. He hasn’t got all of his blue feathers in yet.

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The scarlet tanager has black wings.

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The summer tanager is the only all red bird in America (according to All About Birds)

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Female red breasted merganser.

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And a pretty cactus flower just for fun.

These were taken at Fort Desoto in early April when spring migrating birds were stopping by for a rest before heading north for the summer. There wasn’t a ton of birds but a few good ones.

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Yellow birds at Fort Desoto

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All above are white eyed vireos. Fairly common during migration.

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All of these are of a hooded warbler. The park was filled with these bright yellow birds with black hoods. They were not shy and would not freak out and fly into the bushes. They remained on the trail as long as no one got too close.

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I saw one prairie warbler at the park.

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A single yellow throated warbler. I don’t see these too often.

It poured the last Friday in March. I never get that lucky. Usually, it pours early in the week and by the time I get out to the parks, the birds are gone. This time I got up early on Saturday and headed down to Fort Desoto. Not a big fall out but still enough birds to keep everyone entertained. I think there was possibly more people than birds though.  I’m hoping this is only the first fall out for spring migration this year. It’s still early.

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