Birds and boats at Fort Desoto

A rare yellow billed cuckoo high up in the tree.

Either a female or immature prairie warbler.

Hiding in hole. I was wondering if they nest in this hole.

Some of the shorebirds close to the trail, a ruddy turnstone and a black bellied plover.

I stopped by the fishing pier before heading home.

Far across the bay near Egmont Key.

Sailing past the pier, this old sailboat reminded me of my dad. He would have loved that boat. I turned it into a black and white photo so it would have looked like something he would have taken many years ago.

An early summer walk at Fort Desoto.

SkyWatch Friday

Yellow birds at Fort Desoto

DSC_3758 DSC_3586 DSC_3515

All above are white eyed vireos. Fairly common during migration.

DSC_3542

DSC_3539

DSC_3719

All of these are of a hooded warbler. The park was filled with these bright yellow birds with black hoods. They were not shy and would not freak out and fly into the bushes. They remained on the trail as long as no one got too close.

DSC_3732 DSC_3696

I saw one prairie warbler at the park.

DSC_3574

A single yellow throated warbler. I don’t see these too often.

It poured the last Friday in March. I never get that lucky. Usually, it pours early in the week and by the time I get out to the parks, the birds are gone. This time I got up early on Saturday and headed down to Fort Desoto. Not a big fall out but still enough birds to keep everyone entertained. I think there was possibly more people than birds though.  I’m hoping this is only the first fall out for spring migration this year. It’s still early.

Our World Tuesday Graphicimage-in-ing

Migration can be a pain in the neck – Skywatch Friday

DSC_8456

My first blackpoll warbler of the season.

DSC_8478

Cape May warblers were everywhere.

DSC_8525

Red-eyed vireo.

DSC_8556

A first-summer male orchard oriole with mulberry stains on his chest.

DSC_8560

I think this is a female orchard oriole.

DSC_8565

I think this is a first year female Baltimore oriole.

DSC_8572

Another red-eyed vireo.

DSC_8609

I saw one northern Parula that morning.

DSC_8613

Baltimore oriole.

DSC_8657

My first black throated green warbler.

DSC_8678

A male orchard oriole taking a berry break.

DSC_8721

Prairie warbler doing some weird acrobats.

DSC_8769

Bye,bye, orchard oriole.

DSC_8492

 A female rose breasted grosbeak.

It was a busy day in mid-April. A big fall out day. Spring migration was in full swing and I knew I’d come home with a neck ache from staring up in the trees all morning. I was right. Birds were everywhere but they did not sit still very long. There were almost as many people at Fort Desoto that morning. Everyone was yelling out bird names: “there goes a female blah blah”, ” I just saw an immature male blah blah”, ” has anyone seen the yellow blah blah?” All of the little birds were starting to looking alike, especially the yellow and brown ones. Let me know if I got any of the above wrong. People had driven from all over the state to check birds off their list. I met a ton of new people and ran into people I hadn’t seen since the last migration. It was catch up day. The next couple of weekends still had a few birds but not like this big weekend. I also saw a lot of little red birds and blue birds. More on those later.

Check out more sky pictures at Skywatch Friday

 

Little yellow birds invade Fort Desoto

DSC_7495

Hooded warblers were everywhere. They were walking around in the grass and posing for everyone. I saw this bird last year but never got a shot so this is my first official hooded warbler shot.

DSC_7480

Prairie warblers aren’t too common. There were many of these on the east beach trails.

DSC_7485

After I cropped this up I realized there were tiny white bugs all over the leaves. I think that’s what he was eating.

DSC_7469

White eyed vireos are common during spring migration.

DSC_7473

This one was trying to hide in the fir trees.

DSC_7415

Yellow throated warblers were common around the ranger’s house this weekend.

DSC_7406

My very first prothonotary warbler.

DSC_7403

He was posing for me right when I hit the trail that morning.

Central west Florida had a small fall-out this past weekend. A big storm came through the Tampa Bay area on Thursday and by Friday afternoon, people were posting great migrating birds all over the area. The most populated seemed to be at Fort Desoto so I headed down there early Saturday morning. I skipped the beach and went straight to the woods. I spent over 4 hours looking for little birds in the bushes and trees.  Of course, everyone else had the same idea so it was pretty crowded on trails. Everyone was so nice pointing out things they had seen. I do not know my little birds very well and usually shoot first and look up species later. Saturday I left knowing all but one bird that I had taken pictures of. It was a lot of fun and I met a lot of new people and ran into a few old friends I haven’t seen in a long time.  I also saw a few red and blue birds that aren’t cardinals or blue jays so I’ll post those later.

Check out more birds at Paying Ready Attention  for