A typical January walk

Heading out on the trails, something flushed a flock of ibis across the marsh.

A perfect morning in January, cold and clear.

Morning glories along the trail.

The usual birds.

Crazy face hiding in the bushes.

Right over the trail, this osprey was eating fish.

A typical morning walk at Circle B Bar Reserve.

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The ladies were out at the Botanical Gardens

This female summer tanager did not mind me watching her while she feasted on a beautyberry bush. Or, maybe she didn’t see me. I was hiding in the bushes after all. She stayed for a few minutes filling up on berries and then took off.

A female indigo bunting was hiding in the bushes.

A female rose breasted grosbeak was eating something high up in the tree.

Female woodpeckers. A pileated and a downy.

Both males and females look the same for thrashers and green herons so these could be either.

My Corner of the World

A quiet morning at Chesnut Park.

The baby deer from this summer were almost grown up in late mid October. You can barely see the spots on the first two.

The squirrels were busy eating.Some had better snacks than others.

The usual birds were chilling or hanging.

The day after we got back from Boston I was craving a walk in woods so I headed out for Chesnut Park near my house. Back to my shorts and tshirt routine. And now it’s December 2nd and I feel like I should be posting pictures of snow or Christmas decorations but it ‘s just another day in paradise here in central Florida.

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The usual suspects at Chesnut Park.

Lots of different birds at Chesnut Park in early January but nothing new.

Bigger birds flying overhead.

I was trying to get some shots of the deer on the baseball field, She looked at me for a second and then took off to join her friends who were heading into the woods. Oh wait, that’s why they call them “white-tailed deer”.

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A beautiful red head

I heard this pileated woodpecker banging on the fallen log long before I saw him. He was right on the ground next to the parking lot at Chesnut Park. I sat down on the ground and watched him for a while. A few people passed by and he just glanced up and then kept on banging.That red stripe below the beak indicates that he’s a guy. He stayed busy for about 15 minutes. I finally got up and left him still going at it. He didn’t seem to be eating bugs under the bark. Later I stopped by there on my way out of the park and he was gone.

[Linking to Wednesday Around the World.

Lots of the same at Chesnut Park

Lots of deer in early January.

Lots of squirrels but that bottom looks a little rough.

Lots of little birds but nothing new.

Red shoulder hawks hiding along the trails.

Eagles flying far away across the lake. Both an adult and a juvenile.

Found these two ducks at a quiet end of a pond. I’m thinking they are pets that got dumped here. Someone left food in a small plastic container. I just hope they know enough to stay away from the gators.

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High up in the trees.

High up in the trees, I found a red shoulder hawk and a northern parula.

There were also lots of woodpeckers in the trees, a pileated and two downys.

Someone had left some seed on the boardwalk. The cardinal was feeding the baby.

A lone yellow throated warbler.

All taken in late July at Chesnut Park.

Linking to Wednesday Around The World