Just being outside

A beautiful morning out at Fort Desoto. Out on Outback Key, you can see St. Pete beach far off in the distance. That big pink hotel (Don CeSar) really stands out.

Rush hour traffic on the water.

Usual birds around the fishing pier. A ruddy turnstone, loggerhead shrike and a ring billed gull with just a touch of orange around his eye.

TOTO, the banded oystercatcher, was there in his usual spot.

His mate was close by looking for food.

A nice cool morning for a walk on the beach at Fort Desoto in February. Sadly now this is more important than every, just being outside. Yesterday Brett and I went to the beach just to be outside since everything else is closed. Even the zoo is closed (although the keepers will still be there taking care of the animals). I’m working at home for the next few weeks and I’m sure the walls will start closing in. I’m going to try and walk in the neighborhood after work each night to get out. Hope everyone stays sane out there. Thanks for stopping by and let me know how you are coping.

image-in-ing: weekly photo linkup

Our World Tuesday Graphichttp://ourworldtuesdaymeme.blogspot.com/

 

Breakfast with the oystercatchers

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I sat down on the sand at the north beach sanctuary and watched this oystercatcher feeding just outside of the roped off area. They got pretty close to me and seemed very comfortable just walking along digging for slimy gunk. I watched for a while before heading out to the rest of the park. I’ve seen this green banding one there before. He’s a regular in the winter at Fort Desoto park.

Birds at the fishing pier

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Snowy egrets waiting for a handout from a fisherman.

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Cormorants keeping an eye on things from up high.

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The juvenile reddish egret is still hanging around the pier.

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The usual oystercatcher couple trying to stand out in the crowd.

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A sandwich tern taking a bath.

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A young sandwich tern still screaming for Mom to bring a snack.

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A laughing gull with a shell.

Lots of different birds hanging around the fishing pier at Fort Desoto.

Saturday's Critters

Same ole birds at Fort Desoto

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Wilson’s plover

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Sanderling

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Oystercatcher couple

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Bye, bye

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Grumpy snowy egret on a pile of seaweed.

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Great egret goes cruising by.

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“Hey, bring back that crab.”

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“Things are looking up.”

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“Sushi for lunch.”

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Loggerhead shrike on a wire.

Working on my tan at Fort Desoto beach.

Linking to Saturday’s Critters

Oystercatchers – Skywatch Friday

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“Whada ya want?”

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“Wait, don’t snap yet. I have a feather out of place.”

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“I’m not gonna stop eating lady.”

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“Get my good side.”

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“Family portrait. Everybody line up.”

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“I guess it’s just us two.”

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“Look out below! I think I’ve gotta go!.”

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“Come back here.”

The flying pictures were taken at the skimmer colony. As I was standing on the beach taking pictures of baby skimmers, the oystercatchers kept flying overhead. I didn’t see them land. Maybe farther down the beach. The rest were taken at Fort Desoto on a Saturday morning in mid July. There were four of them hanging around the north beach marsh. I had hoped they would have babies with them. I heard there was an oystercatcher couple with a baby inside the big roped off sanctuary area but I didn’t see any that morning.

Check out more sky pictures at Skywatch Friday