More from Lake Morton

DSC_1583

A young stork that looks like an old soul.

DSC_1584

DSC_1632

Besides the swans, both geese and ducks were nesting all around the lake.

DSC_1605

Things were still getting frisky so more babies to come.

DSC_1633

DSC_1639

A wood duck couple were sleeping on the cypress tree roots on the edge of the lake.

DSC_1648

This one looks like a hybrid mallard. Very pretty colors.

DSC_1711

An ibis was stealing the swan food.

DSC_1758

Looks like this stork was working on a nest.

DSC_1718

DSC_1660

The turtles were out sunning themselves.

DSC_1603

A kapok tree flower.

DSC_1607

Sandhill cranes flying high overhead.

There are lots more stuff at Lake Morton than just swans. Lots of ducks, geese, ibis, turtles and birds hanging around.

Our World Tuesday Graphicimage-in-ing

Things around a local lake.

DSC_9258 DSC_9248 DSC_9269
DSC_9271

The usual ducks and geese around the lake.

DSC_9256

DSC_9263

Big footed baby moorhens growing up around the lake.

DSC_9245

DSC_9247

Pretty pigeon with pink feet.

DSC_9242

Checking me out.

DSC_9192

IMG_3297

Cool trees.

DSC_9250

Crescent Lake Park is close to downtown St. Petersburg. It’s a small lake surrounded by houses with a dog park and baseball fields. The Saturday morning I was there was a busy one. Many people out jogging and walking their dogs. No unusual wildlife but lots of ducks and geese, the later I say far away from. If you get close to them and don’t have food they get mean.

Skywatch Friday

The almost usual stuff at the lake.

DSC_6759 DSC_6760

White pelicans who should have been north by now. They were still hanging around central Florida in May.

DSC_6761

Ibis flyby.

DSC_6773

DSC_6777

DSC_6819

The beautiful black neck swans were nesting. I don’t know if the babies hatched.

DSC_6805

Nosy goose.

DSC_6816

Grackle with a snackle.

DSC_6835

A laughing gull couple far away from the beach.

DSC_6842

An injured ibis. He was still able to fly away.

DSC_6804

A turtle in the lake.

I took a quick walk around Lake Morton in Lakeland after my long walk at Circle B Bar Reserve before heading home.

Pretty faces at the lake.

DSC_2085

Some of the geese have all orange beaks and some have the spots on them. Is that a sunburn? Or maybe an age spot?

DSC_2075

The black swans were nesting.

DSC_2073

The only white pelican at the lake that morning. He looks comfy.

DSC_2050

Pretty goose face.

DSC_2070

The old man face.

DSC_2066

Green and yellow face.

DSC_2039

Another pretty goose face. His feathers are darker than the others and I don’t think his eyes are blue.

Pretty faces at Lake Morton in early March. I stopped to see if there were any duck or goose babies. Still a little early.

20mom_badgeWEBShine the Divine

Crazy ducks in downtown Lakeland

DSC_4284

“Hey lady, can you turn out the light?” said the muscovy duck.

DSC_4285

“I’m a happy duck.” said the some sort of mallard hybrid.

DSC_4295

“Going for a swim.” said another mallard hybrid.

DSC_4301

“I am not a mallard!” says the juvenile male wood duck.

DSC_4312

“We are family.”

DSC_4305

“I can swim.” says the American pekin duck.

DSC_4311
“I can flap too.”

DSC_4371

Hanging out with friends.

DSC_4425

“Hey lady, what kind of brown duck is this?”

DSC_4427

“This needs some hot sauce.” says the muscovy duck.

DSC_4423

“For the hundredth time, I’m a goose, not a swan so go away.”

DSC_4450

This mandarin duck couple looks sad. I’m not sure whether the males lose their bright feathers in the summer?

DSC_4446

“Hey lady, get my good side.” says the shelduck.

DSC_4456

“These bugs taste yummy.”

I walked around both lakes in downtown Lakeland, Lake Morton and Lake Mirror. All of the usual summer ducks were present but sadly, one of the shelducks has gone missing. A man who lives close by and feeds the ducks daily told me that he hasn’t seen the other one in a while. I didn’t see him while I was there. Sadly, now the shelduck is all alone.  Anyone want to take up a collection to buy another one for the lonely one at Lake Mirror? You can buy a pair for $275 on Efowl.com.  It doesn’t say but maybe you could get a single one for half the price.

Linking to Saturday’s Critters

Papa Goose and his orphans

DSC_4365

I had read Kim’s post about the baby muscovy ducks that had been dropped off at the lake and the old Papa Goose is being a surrogate parent. I saw them from across the lake so I sat down for a while and waiting to see if they were heading over my way.

DSC_4366

There were only 4 that I saw that morning. One was staying close to Papa Goose. The other 3 were cruising around like they owned the lake.

DSC_4387

They floated their way into the lily pads and came near the edge of the lake. I’m sure they came close to see if I had food for them.

DSC_4380

When they realized I didn’t, they started eating the bugs off the underneath of the lily pads.

DSC_4413

One came on shore for a minute. They are so cute as babies.

DSC_4361

I saw what looked like a much younger baby also with them. He was sitting on the ground and didn’t want to move. Maybe he was tired from trying to keep up.

DSC_4407

They sat down to rest while Papa Goose stayed out in the water. He kept his eye on me though.

Lake Morton should have it’s own TV show. “Life on the Lake”. So much drama. A few years ago, there was a black swan couple that raised a baby goose. I don’t know whether the parents had abandoned him or something happened to them.

Two or three years ago, someone was stealing swan eggs. The city of Lakeland put up cameras in trees this year to try to catch them. I don’t what came out of that. Did they have fewer eggs stolen this year or catch anyone from the cameras? The city was also taking the baby swans away from the parents and raising them at a facility somewhere else. I think the death rate of baby swans on that lake was pretty high. Out of the tons of babies born this past spring, only a few were released back in the lake. I think I read 7  juveniles were back. So what did they do with the rest of them? Sell them off?

Then you have Papa Goose raising any lost muscovy babies as his own. This is not the first time he’s adopted and raised them.

Every once in a while, something unusual shows up like the lone bufflehead who hung out at the lake for several weeks.

In the winter, you have the bald eagle hanging out on the church cross looking for his next meal in the lake.

Always something going on!

Check out more pictures at Our World Tuesday  Our World Tuesday Graphic

Also, check out more birds at Paying Ready Attention  for