Birds at Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park

Nested season had already started for the great blue herons at Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park. Some were just starting to work on nests, some were still showing off for their mate and some were already sitting on eggs.

Resident pelicans.

The permanently injured resident white morph great blue heron was showing his breeding colors in his beak.  The colors were really pretty against his white neck.

A caracara yelling at something. It’s rare to see a caracara in the Tampa bay area so this is a new bird for a lot of people They can usually be found more inland in central Florida. unfortunately this bird is here because he was injured out in the wild and lost a wing.

An eagle with a missing wing.

A wild phoebe flew right in front of me and posed so I had to take his picture.

Linking to My Corner of the World.

Save Our Seabirds

When my sister was here visiting over Thanksgiving weekend we headed down to Sarasota for the day. After spending the morning at Selby Gardens and having lunch nearby we stopped in at Save Our Seabirds to walk around for a while before heading back to Tampa. SOS is a non-profit bird sanctuary and rehabilitation facility. They rescue, rehab and release injured birds. Many of the birds that can’t be released have found a permanent home here.

Many of the birds had missing wings, eyes or legs. It was late in the afternoon when we stopped in so it was quiet and most of the birds were napping.

They do a lot of work with injured sandhill cranes including ones that lose a leg after being hit by a car. They fit them with prosthetic legs so they are able to move around easily but are still not able to be released.

Linking to Wednesday Around the World

More funny faces at the zoo

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An early morning walk at the Lowry Park zoo produced a lot of funny faces. A baby marabou stork all grown up, a screech-owl missing eye that found refuge at the zoo and a loving boat billed heron couple among a few I saw. The caracara in the last picture was shot in the wing. He has a permanent home at the zoo where he can do his hop/fly low on the ground. We don’t really see any caracaras on the coast since they mostly live in central Florida so this is a good chance for kids to get up close and see one.

Birds up close at Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park

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You could hear this sandhill crane calling from all over the park. He was yelling all morning. Maybe he was calling for his mate.

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An injured whooping crane. One of these days I’m going to head to central Florida to look for the wild whooping cranes that winter there.

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This very young spoonbill was not afraid of the tourist. He was right over the boardwalk.

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Pam was having a conversation with him.

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Flamingos having a disagreement.

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Are they a couple?  The caracara on the left is missing a wing and two of his right toes.

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Barred owls make the cutest faces.

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This fulvous whistling duck had a bad right leg. He was limping around.

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My first American wigeon.

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Wood ducks were hanging around all over the park.

There’s a huge variety of birds at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife Park. Birds that you would see in the wild from all over Florida. Most of these birds are injured in some way and have found a home here.  We went up there to see the manatees that hang out in the river that runs through the park but there are so many great birds there as well.  I might have to get back up there later in the springs to check out the sandhill crane, swan and duck babies.

Check out more pictures at Our World Tuesday

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Also, check out more birds at Paying Ready Attention for