Getting frisky in the spring.

You know it’s spring when the mute swans at Lake Morton in Lakeland start mating. I was walking around the lake and saw this pair swimming around together and the fun started right in front of me.

I’m assuming she put up a struggle because it went on forever and at first I thought he was going to drown her. They floated close to a pair of black swans and the black swans seemed disturbed by it.

I thought she got away but he went after her again. At this point the black swans started to chase them and then she kept swimming into them. After a few seconds the black swans ducked out.

It felt like it went on forever, much longer than I’ve ever seen before but it was probably only a minute or two. The male finally got his way and they split up.

They both started to preen and bath and of course the male stood up showing off.

Black swan (not the ballet)

I was at Lake Morton in Lakeland at the end of January and happened to catch some black swans getting frisky. I first noticed the couple swimming together close to shore and watched them flirt for a while. They were wrapping their necks around each other and taking turns dunking their heads under water. It was like a ballet. The end was over pretty quickly.

There was already a black swan couple that had 2 babies.

It never gets old watching the baby swans playing. They were so fuzzy.

I did take notice of a pair of ring necked ducks cruising  by.

My Corner of the World

Seven swans a swimming

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They grow up so fast.  Baby black swans that are teenagers at this point.

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It’s nice to see more black swans around the lake.

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Looks like this swan was getting restless,watching for her babies to hatch.

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I took so many pictures of these little guys.  They were very curious.

Most of the swans were nesting when I walked around Lake Morton in late April. Only a few babies had been born and they were already all grown up. The city has each nest roped off so people don’t get too close.  The swans can be very aggressive if you come near the roped off area.

Linking to Saturday’s Critters

“A hundred swans a swimming”

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One of the juvenile swans born this past spring. They are the size of the adults but don’t have their white feathers yet or orange beaks.  I only saw 4 there a few weeks ago. I thought I had read that 7 were released back to the lake. They may have just been sleeping under a bush somewhere else.

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It looks like this one was posing.

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“Hey, wait for me.”

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They came close to me looking for a handout.

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Getting a drink.

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“Ha Ha, you’re funny lady.”

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Last one of the four I saw that morning.

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A mottled gray version of the black swan.

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An adult mute swan taking a bath.

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Black swans on the lake.

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One of the two black neck swans at the lake. The other was a little farther back.

The morning was perfect. A decent breeze for mid-August over the lake. I hadn’t seen the juvenile swans since they were tiny babies so I had to go back before the winter to see them before they were all white. They were very curious, coming close to me. The lake was full of swans in all colors. Black, white, gray and fuzzy baby tan.

Linking to Saturday’s critters